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Comic Book Heroes With Realistic Bodies Are The Superheroes We Need (Photos)

If superheroes had to sit on the subway and work at a desk all day, would they be any less heroic?

The website Bulimia.com enlisted illustrators to Photoshop the bodies of many superheroes so they’d more closely resemble the average American.

Instead of svelte waists and bulging muscles, Black Cat and her fellow heroines have round stomachs and full thighs.

BlackCat


Although Iron Man can still break free from chains on the cover of his comic book, it takes a bit more force from his thin arms to do so.

Ironman


The site notes more than one-third of American men and women are obese, making the traditional cartoon body type largely unrelatable.

Phoenix


With that in mind, Bulimia.com’s series seems to make the statement that superheroes are incredible, regardless of body shape.

Storm


In the fictional universes in which superheroes reside, their actions speak louder than their bodies.

WonderWoman

The team believes its updated superheroes invite Americans to look at more relatable versions of heroes.

Rogue


A team member told Co.Exist, “The purpose of this campaign was not to make some sort of statement about how depictions of superheroes lead to unrealistic ideas around body image.”

CaptainAmerica


In a statement to the Huffington Post, the team continued, “Our hope is that…[viewers] may feel better about themselves…”

Psylocke


“And realize the futility of any comparison between themselves and the fictional universes of Marvel and DC Comics.”

BlackWidow


Some protested and said superheroes are supposed to be icons of perfection, not the quotidian.

PowerGirl

But, this series is a compelling conversation starter about our heroes and ourselves.

PoisonIvy

What do you think?

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CITATIONS Huffington Post
  1. Huffington Post

    Comic Book Women With Realistic Bodies Are The Heroines We Need

Emily Arata

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Emily Arata is a Women's Editor raised in the Twin Cities. She graduated from Fordham University in the Bronx and previously wrote for First We Feast. She writes about the unlikely ways in which millennials connect with one another.
Emily Arata is a Women's Editor raised in the Twin Cities. She graduated from Fordham University in the Bronx and previously wrote for First We Feast. She writes about the unlikely ways in which millennials connect with one another.

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