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We're Not The “Me” Generation: The Surprising Top 25 Places Millennials Want To Work

If you were to guess where people our age want to work, names like Google, Apple, Facebook or some tech savvy startup would probably top the list.

However, according to the National Society of High School Scholars, an international honor society whose members ages range from 15-27 years old, we're horrible guessers.

A survey conducted by the NSHSS, in which 12,000 of its members participated, led to a list of the top 200 places where Millennials would like to work. Surprisingly, the most sought-after careers had nothing to do with the tech world.

Although some tech companies did make the list, the careers that made the most appearances were those in healthcare and government agencies. This is a bit shocking, considering that technology rules our generation with phones, gadgets, social media and the gaining popularity of startups.

It's also surprising because we are a generation that's supposed to be materialistic, concerned with money and an “all about me” way of life. Though we're dubbed the self-absorbed generation, it seems we actually care about others and seek jobs that don't necessarily pay top dollar.

It's true, and here's the list to prove it:

1. St. Jude Children's Research Hospital

2. Google

3. Walt Disney Company

4. Apple

5. Local hospital

6. FBI

7. Dreamworks Animation

8. Health Care Service Corp.

9. Children's Healthcare of Atlanta

10. CIA

11. Microsoft

12. Mayo Clinic

13. State Department

14. NSA

15. SONY

16. The New York Times

17. Air Force

18. Nordstrom

19. UnitedHealth Group

20. Kaiser Permanente

21. Starbucks

22. Amazon

23. Abercrombie & Fitch

24. Army

25. Navy

The interest in these fields could have a lot to do with what we've experienced as a generation.

We saw the effects of 9/11. We've seen what war does to the economy, to a country and to its people. With information at our fingertips, it's easy for us to stay updated and educated on what's happening in our country, as well as in other parts of the world.

The desire to enter the healthcare field could be attributed to the fact that there was a shortage of workers in the industry, so many people went to school to fill that void.

Now that most of those students will soon graduate or begin their medical careers, it would make sense that the jobs would be in-demand. Medical research has also made leaps with continuing advancements in technology.

All of these reasons could be very true. However, it seems that although the Huffington Post reports that 61 percent of Millennials worry about the state of the world and feel it's their responsibility to make a difference, helping others may only be part of the reason.

In fact, the main reason could be one that is a lot simpler and not as surprising: stability. Like most people, we need to rely on stable jobs in order to provide for ourselves.

We have yet to bounce back from the recession that left 37 percent of us — the highest in three decades — and another 48 percent of college graduates working at jobs that don't require a four-year degree. It's becoming more apparent that jobs with decent pay, benefits and stability are in high-demand.

Go figure: Most of those jobs belong in the healthcare field and government agencies.

Being a technology-based generation may be the key item that sets us apart from other generations, but like those generations before us, we still crave stability.

Photo Courtesy: Tumblr

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Heather Young

Contributor

Heather does a lot of work as a video producer, writer, and on camera talent. Her love of writing stems from being able to tell stories that relate to others and the many years she has kept a journal.
Heather does a lot of work as a video producer, writer, and on camera talent. Her love of writing stems from being able to tell stories that relate to others and the many years she has kept a journal.

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