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Enjoy The Ride: 8 Things To Do In Your 20s To Find Success Later On

Being in your twenties can really suck. It's a stressful, confusing chapter of life between the joyous and beer-infused years of college and actual adulthood.

If you're somewhere between 20 and 30 and you're on the verge of losing your mind (or you already have), don't worry, you're not alone.

A lot of us spend our twenties second-guessing ourselves whilst contemplating the future. Some of us are in hurry to get somewhere while others are content to go nowhere.

You don't have to have everything figured out by the time you're 30. Life is long, chaotic, beautiful, random and dynamic.

The only thing that you can truly rely on in this world is change, it's constant. This is precisely why a person's twenties are so confusing. It's a period of metamorphosis, when we shed our youthful naïveté and begin to shape the world around us from what we've learned.

Success in life is ultimately subjective, and it's based on what a person values. There is no single path toward success. Yet, we can all agree that feeling successful, on a personal level, is largely a product of whether or not you feel fulfilled.

The path toward success is all about finding the balance between what is practical and what we desire.

No one wants to waste his or her life. We all want to ensure that we make the most of it.

Here are eight things to do in your twenties to find success later on. These steps won't guarantee happiness, but they will certainly help ensure that you spend your time wisely during one of the most important decades of your life.

Try as many jobs as possible, don't settle.

Don't box yourself in. Explore what you're good at. Develop a diverse skill set, it will make you more marketable in the long-run.

Not to mention, you'll never look back and think, what would life had been like had I been “this” instead of “that”?

Find what makes you tick. Don't just stay in a job because of the money or because you fear the perils of unemployment.

Ask yourself what you really want in life.

It's impossible to like 100 percent of your job. There will be moments of frustration. Yet, if what you dislike about your job outweighs what you enjoy about it, you're in the wrong profession.

We only get one life, don't waste it doing something that doesn't speak to your soul.

As the philosopher Alan Watts once stated:

Better to have a short life… full of what you like doing, than a long life spent in a miserable way.

Don't allow prescribed notions of success to force you into a profession that makes you miserable.

Life was never meant to be monotonous.


Stop comparing yourself to others.

What other people are doing in life is not a measure of your worth in this world. We all have our own paths.

You will likely struggle in your twenties. You will have moments of despair. There will be times when it feels like all of your peers are far ahead of you, but this is all an illusion.

Success is not achieved overnight; it's not superficial, nor is it a title or plaque on the wall.

Success is about the long game; you have to be willing to put the work in. It requires patience and perseverance.

Comparing yourself to others is a waste of time, an unnecessary and self-imposed obstacle.

Remember that everyone is unique, and that life is not a race, it's a journey.


Become friends with your parents.

Most of us grow up feeling both terrified and in awe of our parents. Parents, for those of us lucky enough to have them, are a person's first model of adulthood.

Indeed, children often view their parents as superheroes, only to grow up and find they are just as flawed as everyone else.

This does not mean that they don't still have a great deal to teach us, however.

We spend much of our teens rejecting and ignoring our parents. It's a natural part of young adulthood in which we feel we know better because we have finally begun to understand the realities of the world.

Believe it or not, even in your twenties, your parents still know more than you. Wisdom is a product of experience.

Become friends with your parents, listen to their advice, learn from their mistakes and value your time with them. Remember that they won't be here forever.


Travel as often and widely as possible.

Humans were never meant to sit still. The world's earliest people were nomadic. Our ancestors roamed the world. Traveling is in our blood.

Your twenties are by far the best time to travel. As life moves forward, you become constrained by commitments. Go while you still can.

There is so much we can learn from traveling. It teaches us the true value of home, while also exposing us to the intricacies of other cultures.

Simultaneously, travel reveals that no matter how different people may appear, we all simply want to live happy and free lives. All humans laugh, cry, eat, drink, sing, dance and love.

Embrace the world around you, there is so much to see and do. Don't just be a tourist, truly immerse yourself in another culture.

Don't just travel outside of your country either, also explore what's within it. Diversity is a borderless entity.

The world would be more empathetic, understanding and compassionate if more people traveled.


Volunteer, do humanitarian work, step outside of your comfort zone.

There is nothing more fulfilling than realizing you have had a palpable and positive impact on other people.

A lot of us are far more privileged than people both within our country and around the world. Much of this is a product of our hard work, but a great deal of our fortune has also been left up to chance.

Give back to the world. Not only will it benefit others, it will enrich your own life and grant you new perspective.

Only those who have lived in poverty can understand its true impact. Yet, it's important for all people to step outside of their comfort zone here and there in order to begin to grasp what it means to struggle.

A society is measured by how it treats its weakest members. If we can learn this in our twenties, we will create a much brighter civilization for the future. Not to mention, it looks great on your résumé.


Exercise, eat right, get healthy now.

As you get further into your twenties, you'll begin to realize that your metabolism isn't as cooperative as it used to be.

Start exercising and eating right now. Don't want until it's too late.

The number one cause of death in the United States is heart disease, caused mainly by our poor diets and lack of exercise.

If you want to live a long and happy life, put the work in now so that you don't suffer later on.

Not to mention, if you want the energy to perpetuate your success as you get older, you need to be in good shape.


Find activities that make you feel fulfilled beyond work.

Work should not be your only source of fulfillment.

Find activities that make you forget about everything that troubles you.

We might move on, quit or get fired from jobs, but hobbies stay with us for life.

One day you'll retire, and you don't want to be left with nothing to do.


Spend your money on experiences, not stuff.

Stop spending your money on material items. None of these things will last, while experiences are eternal.

Your mind is a treasure chest of stories and memories.

Spend your money on things that will enrich your life, not items that provide you with a fleeting sense of satisfaction.

You don't want to end up old and broke with a closet full of moldy clothing and busted shoes.

Life is about so much more than money, which comes and goes as it is. If you can understand this lesson by the end of your twenties, you're already wise beyond your years.

Don't sweat over the small stuff, just enjoy the ride.

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John Haltiwanger

Editor

John Haltiwanger is the Senior Politics Writer at Elite Daily. He was born and raised in DC. John earned an MSc in International Relations from the Univ. Of Glasgow and a BA in History from St. Mary's College of MD. He loves life, and burritos.
John Haltiwanger is the Senior Politics Writer at Elite Daily. He was born and raised in DC. John earned an MSc in International Relations from the Univ. Of Glasgow and a BA in History from St. Mary's College of MD. He loves life, and burritos.

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