New Research Shows People Lie On Social Media To Seem More Interesting

We all know that one person on Facebook who is constantly flexing despite not really living that extraordinary of a life in reality.

From taking pictures of other people's cars to talking about how much they love their jobs, people do all sorts of fronting on social media.

Attitudes on social media usually differ from those in real life, and a new study shows how men and women truly are on verses off of Facebook.

By utilizing anonymous data from thousands of Facebook users, researchers were able to better understand how and why people act the way they do on social media.

Men and women generally have different interests at different ages, from reading to working out. In fact, women tend to start exercising seriously at 34 while men wait until they turn 45 to take action.

The sexes do have similar interests at some ages, with men and women both interested in travel in their late twenties, and an increased interest in food and drink in their mid to late thirties.

Stephen Wolfram, the man responsible for the Wolfram Alpha search engine, conducted the research.

“It's almost shocking how much this tells us about the evolution of people's typical interests,” said Wolfram.

“People talk less about video games as they get older, and more about politics.

“Men typically talk more about sports and technology than women – and, somewhat surprisingly to me, they also talk more about movies, television and music.”

The sexes tend to share different information on their Facebook profiles than each other, but while most people tell the truth, about one in eight people lie on social media about social status, life events, and activities.

People lie on social media to seem more interesting. If you have to lie about yourself to impress people on social media, you should probably get off of the internet and out in the real world. Life should be exciting for you to enjoy, not to impress others on the internet!

Via Daily Mail, Photo Credit: RKOI

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