brownsville-elite-daily

Brownsville Residents Aren’t Receiving Their Mail Because Mailmen Are Scared To Death

brownsville-elite-daily
James Gilbert

Residents in Brownsville, Brooklyn are not always receiving their mail, and while the USPS is supposed to deliver through rain, sleet and snow, gangbangers and thugs are deterring them from delivering.

“The neighborhood is bad,” a US Postal Service Worker told The Post outside the Brownsville Station Post Office on Bristol Street. “I wouldn’t want to go into those buildings.”

Brownsville is one of the most dangerous neighborhoods in Brooklyn, and snail mail  has come to a screeching halt in the neighborhood.

“Have you seen this neighborhood? It’s on the news every day,” the terrified mail carrier said.

Residents of the neighborhood are not accepting the excuses, with approximately 50 residents gathering in front of the Brownsville post office yesterday.

 “The postal workers have a right to fear for their life,” said Quantanya White, 38, a home health-care worker. “It doesn’t give them the right not to deliver the mail. Just because this place is bad, you’re not going to deliver the mail?

“But I do understand why the mailmen feel fear. If I feel unsafe going into certain buildings, they must also.”

State Senator Eric Adams cannot believe the fact that residents are not receiving mail because mail carriers are fearful.

“That is unbelievable. Government services can’t be stopped at the boundaries of high-crime areas,” he said. “They need to re-read that motto — through hail, sleet and snow.”

Senator Adams, who represents Brownsville and is running for borough president, said he has not heard of any postal workers being assaulted or robbed in his district.

Brownsville, home of rapper Sean Price and rap duo M.O.P., has its fair share of notoriety for being one of the toughest neighborhoods in the city.

This isn’t an excuse for residents not receiving their mail, however.

 “We do pay taxes,” said Crystal Caesar, 30, a social-service worker. “They could make more of an effort to ring my bell when I have a package. It’s a headache to come to the post office.”

Brownsville residents feel they’re being discriminated against because of their neighborhood of residency.

“We’re getting bad service here because it’s Brownsville,” said Yolanda Matthews, 58. “People on Riverside Drive get their mail at 10 in the morning,” she said “Something’s got to change.”

James Gilbert

James Gilbert

Editor

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