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You Can Literally Make Over $13,000 A Year Just By Pooping

Your frozen poop could save a life and earn you thousands of dollars.

It’s not a punchline, but rather an innovative medical donation system that began helping the sick in 2012.

Thanks to medical resource nonprofit OpenBiome, fecal matter can be put to good use instead of being flushed down the toilet.

The samples go to aid those with Clostridium difficile, an infection, commonly acquired in hospitals, that causes inflammation of the colon.

Thanks to OpenBiome’s efforts toward spreading awareness of Fecal Microbiota Transplantation (FMT), many C difficile sufferers are able to leave their homes and rid themselves of infection.

Instead of patients and care providers seeking out fecal matter themselves, OpenBiome provides a steady supply of pre-tested poop to shorten each person’s waiting time.

The donations ($40 per sample) are frozen, then make their way to the patient’s gastrointestinal tract by way of capsule or endoscopy.

If you’re already planning a budget around poop donation as a part-time job, you should probably still form a backup plan.

The Washington Post reports about 4 percent of OpenBiome’s 1,000 donation applicants are accepted due to rigid health standards, ensuring only the highest quality fecal matter makes its way into the bodies of those suffering.

And since C difficile claims a reported 14 to 30,000 lives each year, this fecal bank is no laughing matter.

Live long, and donate your poop.

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CITATIONS Washington Post
Emily Arata

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Emily Arata is a Women's Editor raised in the Twin Cities. She graduated from Fordham University in the Bronx and previously wrote for First We Feast. She writes about the unlikely ways in which millennials connect with one another.
Emily Arata is a Women's Editor raised in the Twin Cities. She graduated from Fordham University in the Bronx and previously wrote for First We Feast. She writes about the unlikely ways in which millennials connect with one another.

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