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Librarian Tells 9-Year-Old Boy To Read Less Because He’s Making Other Kids Feel Inadequate

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Robert Gordon

A New York librarian wants a 9-year-old boy to stop reading so much because he’s hogging the prizes from the summer reading club’s annual reading competition.

Librarian Marie Gandron, director of the Hudson Falls Public Library, is accusing 9-year-old Tyler Weaver of reading too much and “hogging” the prize of the “Dig into Reading” competition.

Weaver has taken the prize five years in a row thanks to his diligent efforts to read constantly.

Tyler won the latest competition by reading 63 books in six weeks, much more than the ten books necessary to qualify for the prize, which is an invitation to an end-of-summer party.

Tyler has read a total of 373 books over the past five summers, and is an intermediate scholar student at Hudson Falls School.

“It feels great,” Tyler said. “I think that was actually a record-breaking streak.”

Gandron is not pleased with Tyler, saying his efforts have caused other kids to give up on the competition.

“Other kids quit because they can’t keep up,” she said to the Post-Star.

Gandron wants Tyler to “step aside” from the competition because his ambition is too strong for other kids to compete with.

While previous winners have lied about the amount of books they’ve read, a library aide says Tyler has been tested on every single book, and he has indeed read them all.

Gandron thinks Tyler’s reading prowess is too strong to compete with, and that a new winner should be awarded.

Lita Casey, a library aide at Hudson Falls for 28 years, does not agree with Gandron, however, and has complained to a library board member about Gandron’s grudge against the boy.

“We’re not going to see some of these kids until next year, and you’re worried about them (being treated equally), and then, you’ve got two kids who come in every week taking books out?” she said.

“My feeling is you work, you get it. That’s just the way it is in anything. My granddaughter started working on track in grade school and ended up being a national champ. Should she have backed off and said, ‘No, somebody else should win?’”

The attitude of it “not being fair” that Tyler works harder than other children at reading the most is one of the worst things to promote for the children’s wellbeing. Working hard should be rewarded, and Tyler should win the prize until someone rightfully dethrones him as the king of the books.

Via Daily Mail, Photo courtesy Facebook 

Robert Gordon

Robert Gordon

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