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The Way You Put On Eyeliner Could Be Seriously Affecting Your Vision

You already know how difficult it is to perfectly line the outside of your eyes. So, imagine trying to put eyeliner on the inner rims of your eyes — a technique called tightlining.

It’s not fun, but some beauty gurus like the look so much, they can’t live without it.

Unfortunately, a three-person study from Canada’s University of Waterloo shows it’s probably not a good idea — in case you hadn’t guessed that already.

Researcher Alison Ng used video tracking to compare the amount of Avon’s “Glimmerstick” eyeliner that migrated into the eye’s tear film (its top layer) when it was placed both inside and outside of the lash line.

When the liner was close to the eye, it showed up in the eye itself within five to 10 minutes of application. After two hours, thankfully, the specks had dissipated from the tear film of all participants’ eyes.

When eyes were tightlined, 15 to 30 percent more liner specks moved into the eye than when makeup stayed outside the lash line. Can someone say,

Ew?

According to Ng, this is the first study to examine the way eyeliner moves into the eye itself. She’s hoping her results will be taken into consideration by those considering contact lenses and eye health. As you might imagine, having an eye full of pigmented particles is anything but natural.

Don’t feel bad if you could never master tightlining — turns out, it’s better that way.

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Emily Arata

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Emily Arata is a Women's Editor raised in the Twin Cities. She graduated from Fordham University in the Bronx and previously wrote for First We Feast. She writes about the unlikely ways in which millennials connect with one another.
Emily Arata is a Women's Editor raised in the Twin Cities. She graduated from Fordham University in the Bronx and previously wrote for First We Feast. She writes about the unlikely ways in which millennials connect with one another.

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