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These Women Prove Real Post-Pregnancy Bodies Are Beautiful (Photos)

With a 5-week-old baby in her arms, Jade Beall had never been more beautiful.

Her body was shaped in unfamiliar ways and had 80 pounds of extra weight, and the Tuscon, Arizona photographer didn't feel anything less than perfect.

However, she soon came to realize not all women felt that way.

Beall is the founder of A Beautiful Body Project, a photographic movement to show the world what the bodies of mothers really look like.


Physical changes that come with bringing a new life into the world are awe-inspiring.


According to Beall's website, “Jade’s dream is to inspire future generations of women to be free from the unnecessary self-suffering and embrace their beauty just as they are.”


In fact, she just released a crowdfunded book of post-pregnancy photographs.


It also includes the stories of each mother.


Her website includes endless comments, thanking Beall for helping new mothers feel beautiful.


The responses indicate many women have never seen unedited images of postpartum women before.


She shares each experience, treating her subjects with infinite respect.


Beall has received flak from social media outlets like Facebook, where a group photo of breastfeeding mothers was censored earlier this month.


She told Cosmopolitan, “I received many private messages (all from men) telling me I should remove the photo, though I’d posted the image with nipples and genital areas blurred.”


“…What I would love most is for Americans to redefine their relationship to a woman’s breasts and to praise and celebrate the nude, varying body shapes without having to label them ‘disgusting’ or ‘unhealthy.'”


These are “The Bodies of Mothers.”


And they are gorgeous.

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Emily Arata

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Emily Arata is a Women's Editor raised in the Twin Cities. She graduated from Fordham University in the Bronx and previously wrote for First We Feast. She writes about the unlikely ways in which millennials connect with one another.
Emily Arata is a Women's Editor raised in the Twin Cities. She graduated from Fordham University in the Bronx and previously wrote for First We Feast. She writes about the unlikely ways in which millennials connect with one another.

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