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No Blisters Here: How To Make A Too-Small Shoe Fit In Just 4 Easy Steps

There's no feeling of success like the one that comes from finding the perfect pair of shoes.

Like following a treasure map to the coveted “X,” digging out ballerina flats that fit your taste feels like a life-changing victory. It can be good for your budgeting skills, too — particularly if the shoes are on sale.

If you're like us, however, you're quick to jump on a deal without fully considering the consequences. The dilemma often ends in sore feet, shoes you never wear or sizes that are just a tad too small to be comfortable.

shoes

 

With fall just around the corner, it's important to make sure your toes aren't suffering from being stuffed into closed-toe shoes. If your favorite new leather kicks feel too tight, grab a hair dryer. This simple hack will have your feet feeling better in no time.

Try the shoe on, just one more time.

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Before you start this shoe hack, it's important to understand just how much you'll have to stretch the leather. Attempt to fit the shoe on your foot, getting a sense of the tight areas.


Pull on a wooly winter sock.

sock

Dig through your winter clothes for your bulkiest pair of cold-weather socks, then pull them on. Sure, your feet may feel a little overdressed for the weather, but it will all be worthwhile soon.


Force your sock foot back into the shoe.

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Make like Cinderella's ugly stepsisters and will yourself back into the shoe, sock and all. Forcing an oversized foot into a too-small container will help make the leather stretch, and provide a mold for the shoe once it's heated.


Break out your hairdryer on high.

hairdryer

 

Finally, a use for the blow dryer you've been storing since you became too lazy to dry your hair manually! Turning the dryer up to high, move it around the shoe in an attempt to heat the leather. Keeping the dryer in motion, warm the shoe for several minutes. Let it cool with your foot still inside, and then try out your newly stretched shoes.

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Emily Arata

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Emily Arata is a Women's Editor raised in the Twin Cities. She graduated from Fordham University in the Bronx and previously wrote for First We Feast. She writes about the unlikely ways in which millennials connect with one another.
Emily Arata is a Women's Editor raised in the Twin Cities. She graduated from Fordham University in the Bronx and previously wrote for First We Feast. She writes about the unlikely ways in which millennials connect with one another.

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